Call your doctor before leaving home if you think you’ve been exposed to COVID-19 or have symptoms

  • Starting March 23, updated visitor restrictions are in place at Duke Health. No visitors will be allowed into our hospitals until further notice with some limited exceptions. Outpatient restrictions have not changed. Learn More

  • Effective immediately, Duke Health is prioritizing and rescheduling some non-emergent or non-critical surgeries, procedures, and appointments. Learn More

Outcome Based Quality Scores

These scores show how patients who were treated for certain conditions fared.

Hospital Death (Mortality) Rates

Hospital 30-day mortality (death) rates for Duke patients compared to the U.S. national rate, by condition

 Duke Raleigh HospitalDuke University HospitalDuke Regional Hospital
Heart attack No different than U.S. national rateNo different than U.S. national rateNo different than U.S. national rate
 Heart failure No different than U.S. national rateNo different than U.S. national rateNo different than U.S. national rate
Pneumonia Better than the U.S. national rateBetter than U.S. national rateNo different than U.S. national rate

The date range for the rates displayed in this graph is July 1, 2015 – June 30, 2018. Source: www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare

What Does This Chart Mean?

"30-day mortality" is when patients die within 30 days of their admission to a hospital.

The chart above tells you how well Duke hospitals death rates compare to national rates for heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia patients.

The chart takes into account how sick the patient was upon admission to the hospital.

Hospital 30-Day Readmission Rates

How Duke patients compare to the U.S. national rate

 Duke Raleigh HospitalDuke University HospitalDuke Regional Hospital
Rate of readmission after discharge from hospital (hospital-wide)No different than U.S. national rateNo different than U.S. national rateNo different than U.S. national rate

The date range for the rates displayed in this graph is July 1, 2015 – June 30, 2018. Source: www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare

What Does This Mean?

The overall rate of unplanned readmission after discharge from the hospital (also called “hospital-wide readmission”) focuses on whether patients who were discharged from a hospital stay were hospitalized again within 30 days. All medical, surgical and gynecological, neurological, cardiovascular, and cardiorespiratory hospital patients are included in this measure. Patients may have been readmitted back to the same hospital or to a different hospital. They may have been readmitted for a condition that is related to their recent hospital stay, or for an entirely different reason.

The overall rate of unplanned readmission show whether a hospital is doing its best to prevent complications, provide clear discharge instructions to patients, and help ensure patients make a smooth transition to their home or another setting like a nursing home.